I have started to love using AirBnB and VRBO for vacation rentals when going on vacation.  It's generally a lot cheaper than a hotel, and you can have either your whole family in a house, or a group of friends can all stay together in a home and it can really be fun with everyone splitting the cost.  This can make a vacation in a really nice place much for affordable than staying in a hotel or resort.

Vergas, Minnesota is located a few miles off of Hwy 10 near Frazee on County Road 17.  It's about an hour outside of Fargo, ND.  And honestly, there's not a lot going on there.  It's a sleepy little town with a population of about 331 according to the latest census.  I get if you'd like to have a little family get-away staycation.  Hang out on a lake with all that has to offer.  But would you pay over $300,000 for an AirBnB in a town like this?  To be more accurate, it's $326,039 per month (and you HAVE to book for a month), $275 for a cleaning fee, $34,624 for a "service fee" (have no idea what that is) for a grand total of $360,961 per month!  And I remind you that a month rental is a requirement. Good grief!  WHO would do that?  Who has that kind of money around here to do that, AND if you did, would you want to blow it on an AirBnB in VERGAS?  Probably not.

Just a thought - maybe the guy who owns it is trying to get out of debt?  I have no idea if this is true or not, but it would be a good way to try, if that were the case.  I just can't imagine anyone spending that kind of money on this. And who has the opportunity to take a month off?  Unless you are working from home, then the WiFi is probably another charge. Just a guess.

You can check out the rental here Here are some of the pictures too.  It's ok-but not worth that kind of dough, at least in my opinion.  Also- the description of said rental:

Newley remodeled home on Lake Lida has everything that you would need in a vacation rental. On a picture prefect level lot, it will be hard to find a better sand bottom in the area. Main house is very spacious and perfect for entertaining friends or family. Ver large master shower, bathroom, and closet. Home has two bedrooms and two full baths but don’t forget about the one-bedroom studio over the garage with a mini fridge and microwave with another full bath. Perfect for a large family or couples’ getaway. Each space is large enough to offer extra sleeping if needed.
Just under 60 min drive from Fargo and 3.5 hours from Minneapolis this property will be a great option for you next vacation. Lakeside deck and fireplace will make for amazing views the whole time you are here. You will not want to miss out on this amazing rental. 

 

AIrBNB- Vergas, MN

View from the dock to the back of the vacation rental.  Not much beach area, huh?

AirBnB- Vergas Lake

The lake looks nice.  It's lake Lida.

kitchen- airbnb San-Dee Cove on Lida

Kitchen- worth over $300K yet?

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