The leaves have started to change to their vibrant colors. Pumpkin stands are a plenty. There's bonfire aromas and a crispness in the air. Many are preparing for Halloween. You get the picture...we have truly entered into the Fall season and with that are a few warnings to make sure everyone is keeping safe.

Came across a list the other day, from Patch, that gave several tips on safety cautions you should be taking in the fall. A few of them I had seen before and seem common, but a couple others I was reading for the first time and felt that maybe they should be shared just in case someone else was unaware.

  • 1.) When Did You Check Your Smoke Alarm Last?

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We all know that we should be checking our fire alarms regularly. But when was the last time you actually did check the batteries and to see if it works? We've had a pretty dry summer in Central Minnesota, probably a good idea to check especially with a few more fire hazards like bonfires and candles burning around in the fall.

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  • 2.) Don't Leave Candles Unattended

Photo by Sixteen Miles Out on Unsplash
Photo by Sixteen Miles Out on Unsplash
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Pretty sure everyone know not to leave burning candles unattended, but that doesn't mean we don't forget now and again. This is just that friendly reminder to be more aware if you're burning candles every evening, like my mom does this time of the year.

  • 3.) Be Smart if Burning Leaves

Photo by Ahmed Zayan on Unsplash
Photo by Ahmed Zayan on Unsplash
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Not sure I've ever heard anyone say I love raking leaves, it's my favorite. It's a task that feels endless and thankless to most if not all. Trying to figure out how to dispose of them after you have that giant pile and before it blows away? Burning it not the best of ideas. The Environmental Protection Agency states:

Leaf burning leads to air pollution, health problems, and fire hazards.

They go on to say leaves "contain a number of toxic, irritant, and carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds." Not to mention smoke from the leaves has carbon monoxide.

  • 4.) Beware, Area Could Be Slippery

Photo by Ehud Neuhaus on Unsplash
Photo by Ehud Neuhaus on Unsplash
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Unexpectedly, fall can be slippery. One day everything is gorgeous and still in the 70's in Minnesota and then a cold chill sweeps in and we have rain or a frost and all of a sudden everything is slick. If it rains be sure the wet leaves are cleared from areas where you or anyone walks and take a look on the ground before you walk outside and get caught off guard and fall and hurt yourself.

  • 5.) Take Extra Precaution When Driving

Photo by A n v e s h on Unsplash
Photo by A n v e s h on Unsplash
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In Minnesota I'm quite certain almost everyone likes to think they know how to drive no matter the elements or season. But I'm here to tell you, accidents happen and I see them every year, especially after the first snow fall. We aren't invincible and it doesn't hurt to take a little extra precaution and maybe even time to get you and anyone else safely to their destination. National Safety Council even warns

Night driving is dangerous because, even with high-beam headlights on, visibility is limited to about 500 feet (250 feet for normal headlights) creating less time to react to something in the road...

You know, like deer. Heed their other advice HERE.

  • 6.) Make Sure We Can See You at Night

Photo by Timotheus Fröbel on Unsplash
Photo by Timotheus Fröbel on Unsplash
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Like it or not, we have less daylight and we continue to get less of it until winter solstice, on December 21, 2022. Which means if you are doing an activity outside it's smart to make sure anyone, especially drivers are able to see you. Early morning or late evening runners or bikers have reflective clothing or lights so to help keep you safe.

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Hopefully these tips were a good refresher. Now go enjoy your fall and please, be SAFE!

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